The Walking Tour of Bucharest, Romania Continues

More photos from our self-guided walking tour of Bucharest, Romania. We started this trip downtown Bucharest and walked the entire length back north to our hotel.

Bucharest, Romania

Kretzulescu Church

Bucharest, Romania

Nduku in front of Kretzulescu Church
Kretzulescu Church (Romanian: Biserica Kretzulescu or Creţulescu) is an Eastern Orthodox church in central Bucharest, Romania. Built in the Brâncovenesc style, it is located on Calea Victoriei at one of the corners of Revolution Square, next to the former Royal Palace.

The church was commissioned in 1720–1722 by the boyar Iordache Creţulescu and his wife Safta, a daughter of prince Constantin Brâncoveanu. Originally, the exterior was painted, but since the restoration work done in 1935–1936 (under the supervision of architect Ştefan Balş), the facade is made of brick. The frescoes on the porch date from the original structure, while the interior frescoes were painted by Gheorghe Tattarescu in 1859–1860.

The church, damaged during the November, 1940 earthquake, was repaired in 1942–1943. In the early days of the communist regime, Kretzulescu Church was slated for demolition, but was saved due to efforts of architects such as Henriette Delavrancea-Gibory. More renovations took place after the Bucharest earthquake of 1977 and the Revolution of 1989. To the side of the church now stands a memorial bust of Corneliu Coposu.

Bucharest, Romania

Graffiti next to Kretzulescu Church

Bucharest, Romania

Bust of Corneliu Coposu
Corneliu Coposu was a conservative Romanian politician born in Bobota, Sălaj County (in Transylvania, part of Austria-Hungary at the time). In 1945, after the royal coup against the Antonescu regime, Coposu became deputy secretary of the PNŢ and, after the reunion of Northern Transylvania, the party’s delegate to the leadership of provisional administrative bodies. He was also active in organizing the party as the main opposition to the Communist Party and the Petru Groza cabinet before the 1946 general election.

Bucharest, Romania

These cool looking clocks are scattered around the city

Bucharest, Romania

Bucharest, Romania

Iuliu Maniu statue at Revolution Square
Iuliu Maniu (1873–1953) was an Austro-Hungarian-born Romanian politician. A leader of the National Party of Transylvania and Banat before and after World War I, he served as Prime Minister of Romania for three terms during 1928–1933, and, with Ion Mihalache, co-founded the National Peasants’ Party.

Bucharest, Romania

Memorial of Rebirth at Revolution Square

Bucharest, Romania

The base of Memorial of Rebirth at Revolution Square
The Memorial of Rebirth (Memorialul Renaşterii in Romanian) is a memorial in Bucharest, Romania that commemorates the struggles and victims of the Romanian Revolution of 1989, which overthrew Communism. The memorial complex was inaugurated in August 2005 in Revolution Square, where Romania’s Communist-era dictator, Nicolae Ceauşescu, was publicly overthrown in December 1989.

The memorial, designed by Alexandru Ghilduş, features as its centerpiece a 25-meter-high marble pillar reaching up to the sky, upon which a metal “crown” is placed. Its initial name was “Eternal Glory to the Heroes and the Romanian Revolution of December 1989” (Glorie Eternă Eroilor şi Revoluţiei Române din Decembrie 1989). The memorial’s name alludes to Romania’s rebirth as a nation after the collapse of Communism.

Bucharest, Romania

Equestrian statue of Carol I of Romania
Carol I (1839–1914), born Prince Karl of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen was reigning prince and then King of Romania from 1866 to 1914. He was elected prince of the Romanian United Principalities on 20 April 1866 following the overthrow of Alexandru Ioan Cuza by a palace coup. Following the defeat of the Ottoman Empire in the Russo-Turkish War, he was proclaimed King of Romania in 1881. He was the first ruler of the Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen dynasty, which ruled the country until the proclamation of a republic in 1947.

During his reign, he personally led Romanian troops during the Russo-Turkish War and assumed command of the Russo/Romanian army during the siege of Plevna. The country achieved full independence from the Ottoman Empire (Treaty of Berlin, 1878) and acquired the Cadrilater from Bulgaria in 1913. Domestic political life, still dominated by the country’s wealthy landowning families organised around the rival Liberal and Conservative parties, was punctuated by two widespread peasant uprisings, in Wallachia (the southern half of the country) in April 1888 and in Moldavia (the northern half) in March 1907.

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  1. Linda says:

    enjoyed your pictures-great job with the narration.

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