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Bucharest, Romania

The Architecture of Bucharest’s Buildings

We got our self-guided walking tour of Bucharest started at Strada Pictor Barbu Iscovescu and walking up to Piaţa Romană. Those are street names. I think. Advertising in Bucharest is quite bold. Larger than life. Coke and Pepsi are having it out with which company can out-scream the other.

Bucharest, Romania - Subway

Sitraco Business Center

Bucharest, Romania

Bucharest, Romania

A water jet fountain at Parcul Unirii. Parcul means Park in Romanian. Unirii is the street name.

Local elections are being held June 10 between seven major political parties and a bunch of minority ones. The billboards are everywhere and much larger than the yard signs found in America.

Bucharest, Romania

Another huge building anchored by BRD [bank] Unirii and some apartments

Bucharest, Romania

Apartment building with ground-level retail facing Rome Square off Bulevardul Ion C. Brătianu

Bucharest, Romania

Building on the other side of Rome Square [bottom right]

Rome Square is a small area with a statue based on the Capitoline Wolf:

The Capitoline Wolf (Latin: Lupa Capitolina) is a bronze sculpture of a she-wolf suckling twin infants, inspired by the legend of the founding of Rome. According to the legend, when Numitor, grandfather of the twins Romulus and Remus, was overthrown by his brother Amulius, the usurper ordered the twins to be cast into the Tiber River. They were rescued by a she-wolf who cared for them until a herdsman, Faustulus, found and raised them.

To get across the street, there is an entrance leading to a tunnel that goes under the street. The driving in Bucharest is aggressive and getting across requires more awareness and agility than it should. The boulevard is eight [maybe more] lanes wide and there aren’t many places to cross overground. The passage at Rome Square is called the Latin Passage.

Bucharest, Romania

Cazare in Bucuresti — a hotel.

In addition to massive billboards everywhere, Bucharest is literally spray painted everywhere. The graffiti artists will tag just about any and everything with a smooth surface. At first it was a distraction, but then it started to blend in and become a part of Bucharest’s persona.

Bucharest, Romania

Bucharest, Romania

More graffiti

How’s this for a hospital? Colţea Hospital was built by Mihai Cantacuzino between 1701 and 1703, but in 2011 it was renovated and is now one of Romania’s most modern hospitals though it looks more like a museum.

Bucharest, Romania

Colţea Hospital

Around the corner from Colţea Hospital is University Square which is across the street from University of Bucharest. There were some statues standing amid a lot of construction:

Bucharest, Romania

Heliade Rădulescu, Wallachian-born Romanian academic, Romantic and Classicist poet, essayist, memoirist, short story writer, newspaper editor and politician.

Heliade Rădulescu is considered one of the foremost champions of Romanian culture from the first half of the 19th century, having first risen to prominence through his association with Gheorghe Lazăr and his support of Lazăr’s drive for discontinuing education in Greek. Over the following decades, he had a major role in shaping the modern Romanian language, but caused controversy when he advocated the massive introduction of Italian neologisms into the Romanian lexis. A Romantic nationalist landowner siding with moderate liberals, Heliade was among the leaders of the 1848 Wallachian revolution, after which he was forced to spend several years in exile. Adopting an original form of conservatism, which emphasized the role of the aristocratic boyars in Romanian history, he was rewarded for supporting the Ottoman Empire and clashed with the radical wing of the 1848 revolutionaries.

Bucharest, Romania

Equestrian statue of Michailv Voevodv

Bucharest, Romania

Gheorghe Lazăr

Gheorghe Lazăr (1779–1821) was a Transylvanian-born Romanian scholar and the founder of the first Romanian language school. His school signified the break with a tradition of schooling in Greek (prevalent under Phanariote rule), and also marked a step towards secularism in education. Lazăr was one of the first wave of Romanian Transylvanian teachers to shape schooling in both Wallachia and Moldavia throughout the 19th century.

Bucharest, Romania

A Russian church called Students’ Church or “St. Nicholas” Church

Bucharest, Romania

Tereasa Cercului Militar

Palatul Cercului Militar National in Bucharest, or short Cercul Militar, was built in 1911 and is the cultural headquarters of the Romanian Army. Cercul Militar is situated in the Center of Bucharest, in the university zone, on Calea Victoriei. Beside the Army administration, a lot of cultural events in Bucharest are held there.

Bucharest, Romania

Casa Capsa Hotel

Established in 1852, Casa Capsa Hotel is the symbol of Romanian “high-life” society. The Hotel has retained its old-world charm even after the restoring actions. It’s a somptous location with sparkling chandeliers and baroque furnishing. The superbly equipped Hotel Casa Capsa is situated in the center of Bucharest, offering comfortable rooms all with matrimonial beds and exquisite furnishings. The pastry shop at the Casa Capsa serves traditional homemade sweets which were prepared after the original recipe, including baklava, bonbons and chocolates.

Bucharest, Romania

Odeon Theatre
The Odeon Theatre (Teatrul Odeon in Romanian) is a theatre in Bucharest, Romania, located on Calea Victoriei, and is one of the best-known performing arts venues in Bucharest. As an institution, it descends from the Teatrul Muncitoresc CFR Giuleşti, founded 1946; it moved to its current location, the Sala Majestic, in 1974. In 1990, after the Romanian Revolution of 1989, the theatre changed its name from Giuleşti to Odeon. In 1993, it won the Romanian Theatre of the Year Award. The theatre was built in 1911, and previously housed the Comedy Theatre of the Romanian National Theatre.

Mustafa Kemal Atatürk

Mustafa Kemal Atatürk was an Ottoman and Turkish army officer, revolutionary statesman, writer, and the first President of Turkey. He is credited with being the founder of the Republic of Turkey.

Atatürk was a military officer during World War I. Following the defeat of the Ottoman Empire in World War I, he led the Turkish national movement in the Turkish War of Independence. Having established a provisional government in Ankara, he defeated the forces sent by the Allies. His military campaigns gained Turkey independence. Atatürk then embarked upon a program of political, economic, and cultural reforms, seeking to transform the former Ottoman Empire into a modern, westernized and secular nation-state. The principles of Atatürk’s reforms, upon which modern Turkey was established, are referred to as Kemalism.

Talk about the old and new!

Bucharest, Romania

Another massive building I found cool.

Taxi cabs everywhere. Everywhere.

Academia de Studii Economice Bucureşti

The Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies (Academia de Studii Economice Bucureşti, or ASE, in Romanian) is the oldest university of economics and business studies in Romania. It was founded in April 6, 1913 in Bucharest, by the royal decree of Carol I of Romania, under the name Academy of High Commercial and Industrial Studies. Since 1967 it is known as the Academy of Economic Studies and has become one of the largest higher education institutes in both Romania and South-Eastern Europe.

Hotel Duke, in the background, just off Piaţa Romană [Roman Square in English]

Bucharest, Romania

Coke doing it big, facing Piaţa Romană

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