Tag-Archive for » Traffic «

Differences Between American and Kenyan Dairy Products and Road Rules

Just a quick note about the differences in our dairy section and Kenyan’s dairy products. See, we have a section of the stores just for dairy, 99.9 percent of the time it’s refrigerated. In Kenya, though, however they produce their dairy products, no refrigeration needed.

I actually find this a bit disturbing, but the eggs were a bit tastier than ours and the butter never melts. Go figure. more…

Getting Around Athi River Traffic on Mombasa Highway on the Way to Kitui

Traffic.

Wherever you go, you can’t avoid it. It’s a phenomenon that when you get on the highway, everyone else gets on at exactly the same time! And when the highway you’re traveling is one lane each direction; you have to share with massive trucks, hundreds of cars and matatus; and it’s Christmas — you best be prepared for anything.

We finally started our journey to Kitui for Christmas. It started off easy enough. Nothing like driving back from the coast [still the worst traffic ever]. We’re rolling, and the sign hung on the walkway over Mombasa Highway just as you get to Athi River should’ve been an omen.

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Within minutes, there’s a line of cars, none moving, stretching into the horizon. No movement moving forward and no cars coming in the opposite direction. Nothing. Everyone’s confused. Traffic can be bad in Kenya, especially Mombasa Highway, but not like this. This was a bad sign considering we just got on the road and could see cars literally to the end of the earth.

As we sat there, I knew it was just a matter of time before Kenyans did what Kenyans do when stuck in traffic. And any Kenyan reading this knows exactly what happens next.

It started with one person, running out of patience and making a break for it.

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Then the fun began… more…

Hanging Around Embakasi, Mlolongo, Nairobi, and Trying Out Naked Pizza

After returning from the coast and a day before heading out to Kitui, we had a day to just improvise. There were some errands needing to be run, but I just go with the flow when the Malombe sisters head out to shopping centers.

We stopped by a shopping center in Embakasi, a division of Nairobi on the east side. Kenya’s main airport, Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, opened in 1958 and was known then as Embakasi Airport. The lady was explaining to me how much more developed it is now than when she was a kid living in the area. What stood out most to me, though, were how many people just hung their clothes on the balcony to dry. Nothing wrong with it; actually, I found it quite fascinating.

Clotheslines in Embakasi more…

The Grand Tour of Kenya’s Capital City — Nairobi

Just as Hollywood has done an amazing job convincing the world that all of us in America are rich [except the blacks who all live in the ghetto — except Oprah Winfrey], Hollywood has also convinced a lot of Americans that all Africans live in a country called Africa. And they’re all poorer than the blacks living in the ghetto.

Of course my photos from Mlolongo, Kiambu and Wangige doesn’t help the stereotype. And Mombasa, though it has amazing resorts, isn’t quite the most modern city in the world.

But Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, is another story.

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300 Miles of Kenya’s Countryside from Nairobi to Mombasa

Just as soon as we were recovered from 16 hours of traveling with a restless child, we were back on the road for a 6-7 hour road trip to Mombasa. Mombasa is Kenya’s second largest city, a resort town on the coast. The road there, Mombasa Highway, is a highway that you want to traverse before the sun goes down. Freaks don’t come out at night on Mombasa Highway; bandits do.

We rented a minivan, piled in nine deep and hit the road. With Nairobi in our rear view, I was looking forward to see Kenya’s countryside. How does the country look away from the hustle and bustle of the city? How do people live away from the skyscrapers and matatus [I’ll explain them later in this post]? How are we going to last with two two-year-olds who seem to like each other one moment and fighting the next?

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Bucharest Traffic is Organized Chaos! [Video]

At the intersection where Mânăstirea Caşin faces in Bucharest, Romania, the traffic is absolutely chaotic. Najwa and I were crossing the street during a morning saunter in the neighborhood, and either I’m blind or there simply were no traffic lights. There were walk/don’t walk signals, but what’s the point if there was nothing telling the drivers to stop?

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