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Dad and I at the Ruins of Tuzigoot

The Ruins of Tuzigoot in the middle of Arizona

Tuzigoot National Monument preserves a 2 to 3 story pueblo ruin on the summit of a limestone and sandstone ridge just east of Clarkdale, Arizona, 120 feet above the Verde River floodplain. The Tuzigoot Site is an elongated complex of stone masonry rooms that were built along the spine of a natural outcrop in the Verde Valley. The central rooms stand higher than the others and they appear to have served public functions. The pueblo has 110 rooms. The National Park Service currently owns 58 acres, within an authorized boundary of 834 acres.

Tuzigoot is Apache for “crooked water”, from nearby Peck’s Lake, a cutoff meander of the Verde River. Historically, it was built by the Sinagua people between 1125 and 1400 CE. Tuzigoot is the largest and best-preserved of the many Sinagua pueblo ruins in the Verde Valley. The ruins at Tuzigoot incorporate very few doors. Instead they use trapdoor type openings in the roofs, and use ladders to enter each room.

At this site, remains of pithouses can be seen as well as petroglyphs, although the petroglyphs can only be viewed on certain days of the week.

Dad and I at the Ruins of Tuzigoot

Ruins Of Tuzigoot

Ruins Of Tuzigoot

Ruins of Tuzigoot

Ruins of Tuzigoot

Ruins of Tuzigoot

Inside the main chamber at the top of the ruins

Ruins of Tuzigoot

Ruins of Tuzigoot

Ruins of Tuzigoot

Model of the Ruins of Tuzigoot

Ruins of Tuzigoot

Ruins of Tuzigoot

Ruins of Tuzigoot

Ruins of Tuzigoot

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